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Gabapentin Headaceh

How Many Diseases Can Gabapentin Treat ?

Gabapentin is an anti-epileptic medication, also called an anticonvulsant.

Gabapentin (Generic Neurontin ) is used to help control partial seizures (convulsions) in the treatment of epilepsy. This medicine cannot cure epilepsy and will only work to control seizures for as long as you continue to take it.

Gabapentin (Generic Neurontin ) is also used to manage a condition called postherpetic neuralgia, which is pain that occurs after shingles. It’s also taken for nerve pain. Nerve pain can be caused by different illnesses, including diabetes and shingles, or it can happen after an injury.

Gabapentin (Generic Neurontin ) works in the brain to prevent seizures and relieve pain for certain conditions in the nervous system. It is not used for routine pain caused by minor injuries or arthritis. Gabapentin is an anticonvulsant.

Occasionally, gabapentin (Generic Neurontin ) is used to prevent migraine headaches. Gabapentin (Neurontin) and pregabalin (Lyrica) are anticonvulsants and nerve pain medicines which have structural similarities to the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA.

Gabapentin (Generic Neurontin ) is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

Gabapentin (Generic Neurontin ) is available in the following dosage forms:
Capsule
Tablet
Tablet, Extended Release, 24 HR
Solution
Suspension

Gabapentin (Generic Neurontin ) was developed in 1993 and has indications for shingles (‘postherpetic neuralgia’) and partial-onset seizures. It has had a growing popularity in off-label uses for fibromyalgia, pain from a variety of causes, migraine, cocaine withdrawal, anxiety, and insomnia. A related compound, gabapentin encarbil (Horizant), is approved for shingles and restless leg syndrome. Pregabalin was developed in 2004 and is approved for nerve pain from diabetes and spinal cord injuries, fibromyalgia, and adjunctive treatment of partial-onset seizures. Although prescribed off-label for anxiety in the U.S., it is approved for this purpose in the U.K., where it is sometimes called the ‘new Valium’.

It affects chemicals and nerves in the body that are involved in the cause of seizures and some types of pain. Gabapentin is used in adults to treat nerve pain caused by herpes virus or shingles (herpes zoster).

The Horizant brand of gabapentin is also used to treat restless legs syndrome (RLS).The Neurontin brand of gabapentin is also used to treatseizures in adults and children who are at least 3 years old.

Gabapentin is also be used to treat following health conditions:

  • Alcohol Withdrawal
  • Anxiety
  • Benign Essential Tremor
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Burning Mouth Syndrome
  • Cluster-Tic Syndrome
  • Cough
  • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Epilepsy
  • Erythromelalgia
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Hiccups
  • Hot Flashes
  • Hyperhidrosis
  • Insomnia
  • Lhermitte’s Sign
  • Migraine
  • Nausea/Vomiting, Chemotherapy Induced
  • Neuropathic Pain
  • Occipital Neuralgia
  • Pain
  • Periodic Limb Movement Disorder
  • Peripheral Neuropathy
  • Postherpetic Neuralgia
  • Postmenopausal Symptoms
  • Pruritus
  • Pudendal Neuralgia
  • Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome
  • Restless Legs Syndrome
  • Small Fiber Neuropathy
  • Spondylolisthesis
  • Syringomyelia
  • Transverse Myelitis
  • Trigeminal Neuralgia
  • Vulvodynia
Gabapentin off-label usage
Gabapentin off-label usage

One of Gabapentin “off-label” usage is for migraine prevention and treatment, including migraines with or without aura, vestibular migraines. It can reduce the frequency of headaches, pain intensity, and the use of symptomatic medications. Gabapentin is a good preventive therapy for migraines refractory to standard medications.

The chemical structure of gabapentin is related that of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) which is a neurotransmitter in the brain. The exact mechanism as to how gabapentin controls epilepsy and relieves pain is unknown, but it probably acts like the neurotransmitter GABA.

The effective dose of gabapentin varies greatly. Some persons need only 200-300 mg a day whereas others may need 3000 mg or more a day. It may take several weeks to become effective, so it is important to stay on it for an adequate length of time.

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Gabapentin is a commonly used drug

Gabapentin remains a widespread and popular drug.

In 2016, it was the 10th most prescribed medication in the United States, with 64 million prescriptions.

As use of a drug grows, so does the unpredictability of side effects and potential for misuse.

“Once released as an approved drug, the number of people being prescribed the drug jumps substantially (tens of thousands to millions), and there is much more variability in the patient population and less control on how the drug is actually being taken,” said Bilsky.

A study from 2016 found that gabapentin misuse was low among the general population at just 1 percent. But that jumped to between 15 and 22 percent among people who misuse opioids.

“With decreasing availability of commonly abused prescription opioids, it has been suggested that nonmedical users of prescription opioids are substituting other licit and illicit drugs for abuse,” wrote the authors of a 2015 article on gabapentin misuse.

Gabapentin isn’t the only “safe” pain medication to show up on the radar of doctors and lawmakers in recent months, either.

As Healthline previously reported, Imodium — an over-the-counter anti-diarrheal drug — has also seen a surge in misuse. So much so that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced a plan to help cut down on its misuse potential.

Neither gabapentin nor Imodium is particularly good at getting someone high, so reasons for misuse are likely associated with cost and availability.

“It is hard to say what drives the person who suffers from a substance use disorder to switch between drugs and drug classes,” said Bilsky. “The current misuse of gabapentin may be another version of combining drugs to try and maximize the high.”

Editor’s note: This article was originally reported by Gigen Mammoser on April 9, 2018. Its current publication date reflects an update, which includes a medical review by Zara Risoldi Cochrane, PharmD, MS, FASCP.

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Gabapentin

How Many Health Condition can Gabapentin Used for ?

There are a lot of off label usage of Gabapentin.

Gabapentin Can be used for a lot of Nerve Pain related health conditions including Cough, Hot Flashes, Alcohol Withdrawal, Anxiety 161 reviews, Bipolar Disorder, Trigeminal Neuralgia, Postherpetic Neuralgia, Migraine, Insomnia, Occipital Neuralgia, Peripheral Neuropathy,Vulvodynia, Benign Essential Tremor, Epilepsy, Fibromyalgia, Pain Relief, Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy , Neuropathic Pain,Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome,Periodic Limb Movement Disorder, Spondylolisthesis, Burning Mouth Syndrome,Pudendal Neuralgia, Small Fiber Neuropathy.

Use only the brand and form of gabapentin that your doctor has prescribed. Check your medicine each time you get a refill at the pharmacy, to make sure you have received the correct form of this medication. Do not stop taking Gabapentin unless your doctor tells you to. If your treatment is stopped it should be done gradually over a minimum of 1 week. If you stop taking gabapentin suddenly or before your doctor tells you, there is an increased risk of seizures.

Off-label prescription use and gabapentin’s reputation

Even before gaining recent attention for its role in the opioid epidemic, gabapentin had acquired something of a dubious reputation.

While initially only approved for seizures and neuropathic pain, it was widely prescribed and marketed for other conditions and symptoms. Those include bipolar disorder, migraines, insomnia, and anxiety.

It’s also sometimes prescribed for chronic pain.

Off-Label Usage of Gabapentin for Migraine Prevention

Pfizer, the developer of gabapentin, was involved in a lawsuit over their marketing of the drug for these off-label treatments. The company eventually paid out more than $400 million in 2004 to settle fraudulent claims it made about the drug’s uses.

It’s common and legal for some drugs to be prescribed off-label. However, it’s illegal for drug companies to market drugs to treat unapproved conditions.

What’s a migraine? What does a migraine feel like?

A migraine is a common neurological disease that causes a variety of symptoms, most notably a throbbing, pulsing headache on one side of your head. Your migraine will likely get worse with physical activity, lights, sounds or smells. It may last at least four hours or even days. About 12% of Americans have this genetic disorder. Research shows that it’s the sixth most disabling disease in the world.

What are the types of headaches? What type of headache is a migraine?

There are over 150 types of headaches, divided into two categories: primary headaches and secondary headaches. A migraine is a primary headache, meaning that it isn’t caused by a different medical condition. Primary headache disorders are clinical diagnoses, meaning there’s no blood test or imaging study to diagnose it. A secondary headache is a symptom of another health issue.

What is an aura?

An aura is a group of sensory, motor and speech symptoms that usually act like warning signals that a migraine headache is about to begin. Commonly misinterpreted as a seizure or stroke, it typically happens before the headache pain, but can sometimes appear during or even after. An aura can last from 10 to 60 minutes. About 15% to 20% of people who experience migraines have auras.

Aura symptoms are reversible, meaning that they can be stopped/healed. An aura produces symptoms that may include:

  • Seeing bright flashing dots, sparkles, or lights.
  • Blind spots in your vision.
  • Numb or tingling skin.
  • Speech changes.
  • Ringing in your ears (tinnitus).
  • Temporary vision loss.
  • Seeing wavy or jagged lines.
  • Changes in smell or taste.
  • A “funny” feeling.

What are the types of migraines?

There are several types of migraines, and the same type may go by different names:

  • Migraine with aura (complicated migraine): Around 15% to 20% of people with migraine headaches experience an aura.
  • Migraine without aura (common migraine): This type of migraine headache strikes without the warning an aura may give you. The symptoms are the same, but that phase doesn’t happen.
  • Migraine without head pain: “Silent migraine” or “acephalgic migraine,” as this type is also known as, includes the aura symptom but not the headache that typically follows.
  • Hemiplegic migraine: You’ll have temporary paralysis (hemiplegia) or neurological or sensory changes on one side of your body. The onset of the headache may be associated with temporary numbness, extreme weakness on one side of your body, a tingling sensation, a loss of sensation and dizziness or vision changes. Sometimes it includes head pain and sometimes it doesn’t.
  • Retinal migraine (ocular migraine): You may notice temporary, partial or complete loss of vision in one of your eyes, along with a dull ache behind the eye that may spread to the rest of your head. That vision loss may last a minute, or as long as months. You should always report a retinal migraine to a healthcare provider because it could be a sign of a more serious issue.
  • Chronic migraine: A chronic migraine is when a migraine occurs at least 15 days per month. The symptoms may change frequently, and so may the severity of the pain. Those who get chronic migraines might be using headache pain medications more than 10 to 15 days a month and that, unfortunately, can lead to headaches that happen even more frequently.
  • Migraine with brainstem aura. With this migraine, you’ll have vertigo, slurred speech, double vision or loss of balance, which occur before the headache. The headache pain may affect the back of your head. These symptoms usually occur suddenly and can be associated with the inability to speak properly, ringing in the ears and vomiting.
  • Status migrainosus. This is a rare and severe type of migraine that can last longer than 72 hours. The headache pain and nausea can be extremely bad. Certain medications, or medication withdrawal, can cause you to have this type of migraine.

How are migraines treated?

Migraine headaches are chronic. They can’t be cured, but they can be managed and possibly improved. There are two main treatment approaches that use medications: abortive and preventive.

  • Abortive medications are most effective when you use them at the first sign of a migraine. Take them while the pain is mild. By possibly stopping the headache process, abortive medications help stop or decrease your migraine symptoms, including pain, nausea, light sensitivity, etc. Some abortive medications work by constricting your blood vessels, bringing them back to normal and relieving the throbbing pain.
  • Preventive (prophylactic) medications may be prescribed when your headaches are severe, occur more than four times a month and are significantly interfering with your normal activities. Preventive medications reduce the frequency and severity of the headaches. Medications are generally taken on a regular, daily basis to help prevent migraines.

What medications are used to relieve migraine pain?

Over-the-counter medications are effective for some people with mild to moderate migraines. The main ingredients in pain relieving medications are ibuprofen, aspirin, acetaminophen, naproxen and caffeine.

Three over-the-counter products approved by the Food and Drug Administration for migraine headaches are:

  • Excedrin® Migraine.
  • Advil® Migraine.
  • Motrin® Migraine Pain.

Be cautious when taking over-the-counter pain relieving medications. Sometimes overusing them can cause analgesic-rebound headaches or a dependency problem. If you’re taking any over-the-counter pain medications more than two to three times a week, report that to your healthcare provider. They may suggest prescription medications that may be more effective.

Prescription drugs for migraine headaches include:

Triptan class of drugs (these are abortives):

  • Sumatriptan.
  • Zolmitriptan.
  • Naratriptan.

Calcium channel blockers:

  • Verapamil.

Calcitonin gene-related (CGRP) monoclonal antibodies:

  • Erenumab.
  • Fremanezumab.
  • Galcanezumab.
  • Eptinezumab.

Beta blockers:

  • Atenolol.
  • Propranolol.
  • Nadolol.

Antidepressants:

Antiseizure drugs:

Other:

  • Steroids.
  • Phenothiazines.
  • Corticosteroids.

Your healthcare provider might recommend vitamins, minerals, or herbs, including:

Drugs to relieve migraine pain come in a variety of formulations including pills, tablets, injections, suppositories and nasal sprays. You and your healthcare provider will discuss the specific medication, combination of medications and formulations to best meet your unique headache pain.

Drugs to relieve nausea are also prescribed, if needed.

All medications should be used under the direction of a headache specialist or healthcare provider familiar with migraine therapy. As with any medication, it’s important to carefully follow the label instructions and your healthcare provider’s advice.

Alternative migraine management methods, also known as home remedies, include:

  • Resting in a dark, quiet, cool room.
  • Applying a cold compress or washcloth to your forehead or behind your neck. (Some people prefer heat.)
  • Massaging your scalp.
  • Yoga.
  • Applying pressure to your temples in a circular motion.
  • Keeping yourself in a calm state. Meditating.
  • Biofeedback.